Indie Women: Behind-the-Scenes Employment of Women in Independent Film 2018-19

Indie Women: Behind-the-Scenes Employment of Women in Independent Film, 2018-19

EXCERPT

The percentages of women working as directors, writers, producers, executive producers, and editors on independent films reached historic highs in 2018-19.  Women comprised 33% of directors, up 4 percentage points from 29% in 2017-18, and 32% of writers, up 6 percentage points from 26% in 2017-18.  Women accounted for 37% of producers, up 1 percentage point from 36% in 2017-18, and 32% of executive producers, up 6 percentage points from 26% in 2017-18.  Women made up 29% of editors, up 2 percentage points from 27% in 2017-18.  Despite these gains, it is important to note that independent films employed more than twice as many men as women (68% vs. 32%) in key behind-the-scenes roles.  The study provides employment figures for domestically and independently produced feature-length documentaries and narrative films screening from July 2019 through June 2019 at more than 20 high-profile U.S. festivals, including SXSW, AFI, and Tribeca.  Indie Women is the most comprehensive and longest running study of women working in independent film available and has tracked over 80,000 credits on almost 8,000 films over the period from 2008 to 2019.

Thumbs Down 2019: Film Critics and Gender, and Why It Matters

Thumbs Down 2019: Film Critics and Gender, and Why It Matters

EXCERPT

Thumbs Down is the most comprehensive and longest-running study of women’s representation and impact as film reviewers available.  The report considers individuals working for print, broadcast, and online outlets in spring 2019 whose work also appears on the Rotten Tomatoes website.  This year’s study found that women comprise 34% and men 66% of all film reviewers.  This represents an increase of 2 percentage points from 32% in 2018.  Men outnumber women in every job title category and type of media outlet considered.  A larger proportion of films reviewed by women than by men feature female protagonists and have women directors.  When reviewing films directed by women, female critics are more likely than their male counterparts to mention the name of the woman directing the film and to mention/discuss her filmography in a positive manner.